Palm Sunday

Palm Sunday carries the beginning and the end. At the triumphal entry into Jerusalem, Jesus is celebrated like a king. A miraculous, peaceful ruler, but whose further fate is already sealed - Holy Week and with it the days of Jesus' suffering and death are approaching. But this king of the Jews, who comes riding into the city on a donkey, faces this unimaginable task. The evangelist Matthew (21:7-11) describes how the disciples brought Jesus a donkey and set Him on it. "But very many of the crowd spread their garments on the road, and others cut branches from the trees and scattered them on the road," Matthew writes enthusiastically. But the crowds who preceded him and those who followed him shouted:

Much like then, Christians around the world celebrate Palm Sunday, the sixth and final Sunday of Lent; sometimes even with a live donkey. The faithful often gather first in front of the church for the blessing of palm or olive branches. Where palm trees do not grow, palm catkins are taken - depending on the region, these branches come from maple, birch, beech, boxwood, willow, hazelnut or juniper berry. After the blessing of the branches, Christians go to church in a Palm procession. At Mass, the priest proclaims the message of Jesus' approaching passion and death for the first time during Holy Week.

Sunday is Palm Sunday, a movable holiday that follows Easter. Jesus rode on a donkey through the city gate of Jerusalem, and in his honor the townspeople prepared clothes and palm branches in the streets. Palm Sunday ushers in Holy Week, which commemorates the suffering and death of Jesus. Here in the province of Salzburg, this ecclesiastical festival is particularly associated with customs and tradition. Indispensable are the "Palmbuschen", they are considered as ominous blessing bringers - one puts them after the service in special places in the house or puts them in the garden or on the field.

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